Research Cinema

Research Cinema shutterstock 400Sq Gilmorehill Centre, Uni of Glasgow
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Join us for a night at the movies with a difference as we show critically acclaimed films and follow the screening with a question and answer session with our experts. (Image: Shutterstock)

 

 

SCREENING ONE: Causes and consequences of inequality

divide

THE DIVIDE (5.30pm) SOLD OUT
The Divide tells the story of 7 individuals striving for a better life in the modern day US and UK – where the top 0.1% owns as much wealth as the bottom 90%. By plotting these tales together, we uncover how virtually every aspect of our lives is controlled by one factor: the size of the gap between rich and poor. View the trailer here

We follow the film with a panel discussion looking at the causes and consequences of inequality. 

 

Joining us for the discussion will be: 

  • Professor Nicole Busby, Head of the Law School, University of Strathclyde, @lawstrath
  • Ann Henderson, Assistant Secretary, Scottish Trades Union Congress (STUC), @ScottishTUC
  • Dr Angela O’Hagan, Acting Director of WiSE, Glasgow Caledonian University, @WISEResearch; @angelao44; @gcutoday
  • Professor Alexandra Shepard, Director of the Centre for Gender History, University of Glasgow, @GUGENDERHISTORY

SCREENING TWO: The occult and its influence on popular culture

nightofthedemonposterNIGHT OF THE DEMON (8.30pm)
In 1957 classic “Night of the Demon,” based on M.R. James’ landmark horror tale “Casting the Runes” (1911), a sceptical psychologist investigates a sinister occultist whose previous enemies have all come to mysterious ends. The following Q+A will focus on our contemporary fascination with the occult and its influence on popular culture.View the trailer here.

Joining us for the discussion will be: 

  • Dr David Rolinson, lecturer in Communications, media and culture at University of Stirling 
  • Dr Christine Ferguson, lecturer in english literature at the University of Glasgow, @DrStiggins 

This is part of the “Popular Occulture in Britain 1875-1947” project, @PopularOccult